HOUSING | Site Allocations

Future Housing Need In Saffron Walden

4.1 SAFFRON WALDEN NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN SITE ALLOCATIONS

4.1.1    The Spatial Strategy which is part of the eLP allocates sites suitable for development. This list of site allocations began with a ‘call for sites’, to which landowners were able to put forward land to be considered for development. Each parcel of land was then rigorously assessed for “suitability”, “achievability” and “availability” by the District Council. The SWNP considers the findings of the Site Assessments and Policies on Site Allocations to be robust.

4.1.2    As at December 2018, Uttlesford District Council has 3.46 years housing land supply. The SWNP allocates sites for development (see policy SW1). Together this means that when the SWNP is formally “made” (adopted), the local planning authority has an adequate number of dwellings planned so that the policies in this Neighbourhood Plan are binding in planning decisions. This remains the case so long as the District Council has a land supply of over 3 years, and only if the SWNP allocates sites for development.

4.1.3    The eLP Spatial Strategy for Saffron Walden sets out a requirement for 1,393 dwellings to be built over the lifespan of the eLP i.e. until 2033. Since its publication at Regulation 19 stage, an additional site for 100 dwellings, not included site allocations, has been granted planning permission.

4.1.4    In total 1,460 dwellings will be delivered between 2011 and 2033, not including any additional dwellings which will come forward on small windfall sites as urban infill. This represents a minimum of a 23% increase in the number of dwellings in Saffron Walden between 2011 and 2033.

4.1.5    Some of these 1,460 dwellings have been built and outline or detailed planning permission has already been granted to build most of the remainder.

4.1.6    The town of Saffron Walden and the hamlet of Little Walden both have defined development limits and development beyond these limits will be restricted except where allowed by exception according to NPPF. The eLP Policy H5 “Residential Development in Settlements without Development Limits” does not therefore apply to the parish of Saffron Walden because both settlements have defined limits.

SAFFRON WALDEN NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN SITE ALLOCATIONS (SW1)

Status and Site

Total number of dwellings

Subtotals by site

Dwellings built 2011-2016 on sites of 6 more dwellings

533

 

Sites with planning permissions granted as at 1st April 2017

 

235

Reg 19 Policy SAF 8

Land south of Radwinter Road UTT/16/1856/DFO

 

200

Reg 19 Policy SAF 9

Land rear of The Kilns, Thaxted Road UTT/16/1444/OP

 

35

Sites with planning permission granted between 2nd April 2017 and publication of the SWNP

 

582

Reg 19 Policy SAF 1

Land north of Thaxted Rd UTT/18/0824/OP

 

150

Reg 19 Policy SAF 2

Land east of Little Walden Road UTT/16/2210/OP

 

85

Reg 19 Policy SAF 7

Land west of Lime Avenue UTT/17/0255

 

31

Former Willis and Gambier Site, 119 Radwinter Road UTT/14/3182

 

73

Former Willis and Gambier Site, 121 Radwinter Road UTT/13/3406

 

52

Land at Ashdon Road Commercial Centre UTT/16/2701

 

167

Moores Garage, Thaxted Road UTT/14/2003/FUL

 

10

Reg 19 Policy SAF 6

Land south of Tiptofts, Thaxted Road UTT/18/2820/FUL

 

14

Site listed in eLP but not allocated in SWNP

 

-12

Reg 19 Policy SAF 5

Land at De Vigier Avenue UTT/18/2297/OP

 

-12

Sites allocated by the SWNP

 

122

Reg19 Policy SAF 3

Land at Viceroy Coaches, to rear of 10-12 Bridge Street

 

10

Reg 19 Policy SAF 4

Jossaumes, Thaxted road

 

12

Land at Shire Hill UTT/17/2832

 

100

Total number of dwellings in Saffron Walden 2011 – 2033 *

*(not counting small-scale windfall sites)

1,460

 

4.1.7    These maps show the allocated sites

North Of Town

OS PSMA LICENSE NUMBER: 0100057521

South Of Town

OS PSMA LICENSE NUMBER: 0100057521

Land at Shire Hill (indicative outline only, please refer to planning application UTT/17/2832/OP for precise outline)

OS PSMA LICENSE NUMBER: 0100057521

4.1.8    The SWNP makes the following site allocations for residential development:

  • SAF 3 as noted in the eLP and mapped above;
  • SAF 4 as noted in the eLP and mapped above;

These are both in the north map of the town. SAF3 is immediately adjacent to Bridge End Garden, which is a Grade II* Listed Park and Garden, and for this reason SAF3 has a bespoke policy in the SWNP; and

  • Land North of Shire Hill Farm. This site has outline planning permission currently pending agreement of Section 106 contracts [1], UTT/17/2832/OP.

At time of writing the SWNP, the eLP is at examination stage and therefore it is considered appropriate to include the sites also included in the eLP. Should there be any delay in introducing a new Local Plan at District level, these sites will remain protected as development sites by their inclusion in the SWNP. Appendix 9 shows extracts from the eLP of SAF3 and SAF4.

The Land North of Shire Hill is outside the development limits of Saffron Walden. It has been included in the SWNP only because the principle of development at this site for up to 100 dwellings was established in December 2018, and crucially this principle of development included the provision of a spine road which would link the developments to the north (SAF8) and the development to the south (SAF 1). Without such a linking road capable of taking considerable volumes of traffic including buses and HGVs, development at this site would not be acceptable. Should development not proceed as per the application UTT/17/2832/OP, then any subsequent application for this site would be required to demonstrate that it would not have any adverse impacts on air quality, biodiversity, human health and landscape, and must not rely on evidence provided in support of UTT/17/2832/OP. Any new application will be assessed on its own merits within the context of the level of development in Saffron Walden at the time of the application. Any new application must provide a connecting road between the developments to the north and south.


[1] As at 07.10.19

POLICY SW1 SWNP SPATIAL STRATEGY

1.  SAF3 as described in the eLP is a SWNP site allocation and proposals for up to 10 dwellings will be supported subject to specific requirements which are set out in Policy SW3 Land at Viceroy Coaches, other relevant policies in the Neighbourhood Plan and with the following site-specific requirements:

(a) The development provides for a mixed and balanced community;

(b) Development respects the amenity of existing dwellings adjoining the site;

(c) A Transport Assessment may be required to support a planning application and appropriate access arrangements to be agreed and to the satisfaction of the highway authority;

(d) An Air Quality Assessment will be required to demonstrate the development will have no adverse impact on the Saffron Walden AQMA. The Air Quality Assessment will also need to demonstrate that if there is a potential impact on the AQMA, suitable mitigation measures are put in place;

(e) A Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment will be required and should inform the design and layout of the site proposals;

(f) Appropriate ecological survey will be required;

(g) Development will need to be implemented in accordance with design guidance approved by the Council and other Development Management policies.

(h) Implementation of the proposals will be regulated by legal obligation in association with the grant of planning permissions;

(i) The development is designed to mitigate adverse effects upon existing residential and community interests and may be required, by legal obligation, to provide or contribute towards wider and longer-term planning benefits reasonably associated with the alleviation of any such impact;

and

(j) Development does not have an adverse impact on the setting of the Conservation Area and does not impact upon the Listed building of 12 Bridge Street or the surrounding listed buildings or the Bridge End Garden.

2.  SAF4 as described in the eLP is a SWNP site allocation and proposals for up to 12 dwellings will be supported subject to the proposals complying with other relevant policies in the Neighbourhood Plan and with the following site-specific requirements:

(a) The development provides for a mixed and balanced community;

(b) Development respects the amenity of existing dwellings adjoining the site;

(c) A Transport Assessment may be required to support a planning application and appropriate access arrangements to be agreed and to the satisfaction of the highway authority;

(d) An Air Quality Assessment will be required to demonstrate the development will have no adverse impact on the Saffron Walden AQMA. The Air Quality Assessment will also need to demonstrate that if there is a potential impact on the AQMA, suitable mitigation measures are put in place;

(e) Implementation of the proposals will be regulated by legal obligation in association with the grant of planning permissions;

(f) The development is designed to mitigate adverse effects upon existing residential and community interests and may be required, by legal obligation, to provide or contribute towards wider and longer-term planning benefits reasonably associated with the alleviation of any such impact;

(g) A Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment will be required and should inform the design and layout of the site proposals; and

(h) A Contamination report will be required to identify and potential contamination on site and mitigation measures.

3.  Land at Shire Hill as defined by the outline in planning application UTT/17/2832/OP is a SWNP site allocation and proposals for up to 100 dwellings will be supported subject to the proposals complying with other relevant policies in the Neighbourhood Plan and with the following site-specific requirements:

(a) The development provides for a mixed and balanced community to include at least 5% older persons 1 and 2 bed dwellings across tenure;

(b) Development respects the amenity of the existing dwellings adjoining the site;

(c) A Transport Assessment will be required to support a planning application and appropriate access arrangements to be agreed and to the satisfaction of the highway authority;

(d) An Air Quality Assessment will be required to demonstrate the development will have no adverse impact on the Saffron Walden AQMA. The Air Quality Assessment will also need to demonstrate that if there is a potential impact on the AQMA, suitable mitigation measures are put in place;

(e) A Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment will be required and should inform the design and layout of the site proposals;

(f) An appropriate ecological survey will be required;

(g) Development will need to be implemented in accordance with design guidance approved by the Neighbourhood Plan, Uttlesford District Council and other Development Management policies.

(h) Implementation of the proposals will be regulated by legal obligation in association with the grant of planning permissions;

(i) The development is designed to mitigate adverse effects upon existing residential and community interests and may be required, by legal obligation, to provide or contribute towards wider and longer-term planning benefits reasonably associated with the alleviation of any such impact;

(j) Development will need to be implemented in accordance with the Master Plan and design guidance approved by the Neighbourhood Plan, Uttlesford District Council and other Development Management policies. Implementation of the Master Plan proposals will be regulated by legal obligation in association with the grant of planning permissions;

(k) The Master Plan needs to make provision for the delivery of a link road between Thaxted Road and Radwinter Road; and

(l) A Contamination Report will be required to demonstrate there is no contamination on site due to the nearby landfill site.

(m) The layout must not site play areas and other public open spaces alongside the link road.

4.  This housing requirement is not a ceiling for housing growth. However, the only additional development outside the identified allocations or beyond the development limits which might in principle be acceptable will be:

(a) community-led development; or

(b) proposals brought forward by a Community Land Trust group.

In each case the development must be for affordable housing.

5.  The SWNP acknowledges that eLP policies H7 Affordable Housing on Exception Sites, H11 Specialist Housing, H12 Agricultural/Rural Workers’ Dwellings and SP10 Protection of the Countryside will also apply to the SWNP area when the eLP is adopted.


This policy supports the Neighbourhood Plan Objectives 3,4,5

 

WE WELCOME YOUR FEEDBACK ON THIS POLICY SW1

Please use the relevant section numbers as reference markers when writing your comments.

6 Responses

  1. 5.1.4 I’m putting a comment about this point here as not sure where else to post.

    It is possible to walk from one side of the town to the other if in reasonable good health. However, what needs to be factored into the town’s development(& remedial action to established developments) is planning awareness for far greater pedestrian safety. Traffic density at peak times and the speed and nature of vehicles travelling are a hazard in themselves BUT so too is the lack of:
    Safe pedestrian crossings
    Traffic calming measures
    Safe paving – constructed to avoid vehicles being driven at speed up onto and, at times, along pavements
    Pavements being built to create safer pedestrian access( example see Ashdon Rd past Homebase to DeVigier Avenue)
    Pavements maintained ( example plant overgrowth across Victoria Avenue from Thaxted junction; shrubs overhanging pathways necessitating a move closer to/ in roadways to pass along)
    Creating pedestrian cut throughs to facilitate greater pedestrian access across the town
    Get adult cyclists off pavements – new planning to incorporate cycle tracks would be a start

  2. I am concerned about the proposed development both here, and on the water-meadow near the duck pond. I concerned about parking, safe pedestrian routes (no pavements on Freshwell Street), pollution, development within protected areas, restrictions to views.

  3. I am in total agreement with Marion Gillman. I live in the new development opposite Ridgeons and there is absolutely no incentive for people to walk to the town centre rather than drive. For example, because there is no footpath adjacent to Dame Bradbury School, people are obliged to cross the road at least once to walk on the other side, and there is no safe crossing for children. Cars are constantly mounting the pavement along Ashdon Road to get through, endangering the lives of pedestrians and the air is polluted with traffic fumes. Until something is done to address the problem of the abysmal infrastructure and improve public transport, no building should take place to the North or South sides of the town. Everyone should be mindful of global warming and the effects on the environment and encouraging sustainable development. Whereas I do not wish our beautiful countryside to be ruined by a ring road, this may be the only solution to the problem.

  4. With regard to policy SW2, I am in complete agreement about protection of views. Saffron Walden nestles in a valley and this should be preserved as far as possible. It appears that most of the new developments are being built on high land and stand out like a sore thumb, spoiling many of the beautiful views. I know the new B&M is a commercial building but it has ruined the view from Cole End. It could at least have been painted black so it does not dominate the view.

  5. One of the effects of the new developments is to shift the geographic centre of the town east and south. A quick visual estimate would put it around R A Butler school. The actual town centre is well into the north-west quadrant so the library, banks, post office medical facilities, and most retail outlets, are clustered well away from the new housing. Although the town is modestly sized, the geology, coupled with poor pavement provision, means that going shopping and carrying purchases home (often uphill) is a major deterrent to walking. I strongly support Marion’s comments above. Thaxted Road and Ashdon Road are particularly challenging for pedestrians and both of these are key routes from the new developments into town.

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4.1.9    Apart from some recent developments, almost all of Saffron Walden sits in a bowl, as is demonstrated in the map below, which shows the contour lines. (Orange shaded areas show built out or consented development not yet illustrated on online maps). The fact that the town is in a dip provides a considerable amenity to residents and visitors; because from almost any vantage point on the outside of the town, it is possible to see clearly over the top to open countryside beyond. The photographs below the map illustrate this point.

This photo is taken from the south east of the town from a public footpath and it clearly shows the south of the town hidden in a dip.

This photo is taken from the west of the town from a public footpath; but for the church spire there would be no indication that there is a settlement hidden in the dip.

The rural setting of the town is an important characteristic and must be preserved.

POLICY SW2 PROTECTION OF VIEWS

Planning applications for development will have to demonstrate that they will not have a detrimental impact on the rural setting of the town by removing or diminishing the views over the town.

This policy supports the Neighbourhood Plan Objective 4

 

WE WELCOME YOUR FEEDBACK ON THIS POLICY SW2

Please use the relevant section numbers as reference markers when writing your comments.

6 Responses

  1. 5.1.4 I’m putting a comment about this point here as not sure where else to post.

    It is possible to walk from one side of the town to the other if in reasonable good health. However, what needs to be factored into the town’s development(& remedial action to established developments) is planning awareness for far greater pedestrian safety. Traffic density at peak times and the speed and nature of vehicles travelling are a hazard in themselves BUT so too is the lack of:
    Safe pedestrian crossings
    Traffic calming measures
    Safe paving – constructed to avoid vehicles being driven at speed up onto and, at times, along pavements
    Pavements being built to create safer pedestrian access( example see Ashdon Rd past Homebase to DeVigier Avenue)
    Pavements maintained ( example plant overgrowth across Victoria Avenue from Thaxted junction; shrubs overhanging pathways necessitating a move closer to/ in roadways to pass along)
    Creating pedestrian cut throughs to facilitate greater pedestrian access across the town
    Get adult cyclists off pavements – new planning to incorporate cycle tracks would be a start

  2. I am concerned about the proposed development both here, and on the water-meadow near the duck pond. I concerned about parking, safe pedestrian routes (no pavements on Freshwell Street), pollution, development within protected areas, restrictions to views.

  3. I am in total agreement with Marion Gillman. I live in the new development opposite Ridgeons and there is absolutely no incentive for people to walk to the town centre rather than drive. For example, because there is no footpath adjacent to Dame Bradbury School, people are obliged to cross the road at least once to walk on the other side, and there is no safe crossing for children. Cars are constantly mounting the pavement along Ashdon Road to get through, endangering the lives of pedestrians and the air is polluted with traffic fumes. Until something is done to address the problem of the abysmal infrastructure and improve public transport, no building should take place to the North or South sides of the town. Everyone should be mindful of global warming and the effects on the environment and encouraging sustainable development. Whereas I do not wish our beautiful countryside to be ruined by a ring road, this may be the only solution to the problem.

  4. With regard to policy SW2, I am in complete agreement about protection of views. Saffron Walden nestles in a valley and this should be preserved as far as possible. It appears that most of the new developments are being built on high land and stand out like a sore thumb, spoiling many of the beautiful views. I know the new B&M is a commercial building but it has ruined the view from Cole End. It could at least have been painted black so it does not dominate the view.

  5. One of the effects of the new developments is to shift the geographic centre of the town east and south. A quick visual estimate would put it around R A Butler school. The actual town centre is well into the north-west quadrant so the library, banks, post office medical facilities, and most retail outlets, are clustered well away from the new housing. Although the town is modestly sized, the geology, coupled with poor pavement provision, means that going shopping and carrying purchases home (often uphill) is a major deterrent to walking. I strongly support Marion’s comments above. Thaxted Road and Ashdon Road are particularly challenging for pedestrians and both of these are key routes from the new developments into town.

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4.1.10  Because of its proximity to Bridge End Garden, a specific policy has been written for the site SAF3: Land at Viceroy Coaches.

POLICY SW3 SITE ALLOCATION - LAND AT VICEROY COACHES, TO REAR OF 10-12 BRIDGE STREET

The SWNP supports the Local Plan allocation SAF3 but requires the following criteria to be met:

  1. Provision for a mixed community;
  2. Prior approval of a Development Brief which identifies how the development will respect the building line, form and materials of the immediate area and enhance the wider Conservation Area;
  3. The retention or replacement in sympathetic materials of the brick walls of the existing buildings to a height of 2.4m between the site and Bridge End Garden; and
  4. The retention and protection of mature trees and hedging within Bridge End Garden.


This policy supports the Neighbourhood Plan Objective 4

 

WE WELCOME YOUR FEEDBACK ON THIS POLICY SW3

Please use the relevant section numbers as reference markers when writing your comments.

6 Responses

  1. 5.1.4 I’m putting a comment about this point here as not sure where else to post.

    It is possible to walk from one side of the town to the other if in reasonable good health. However, what needs to be factored into the town’s development(& remedial action to established developments) is planning awareness for far greater pedestrian safety. Traffic density at peak times and the speed and nature of vehicles travelling are a hazard in themselves BUT so too is the lack of:
    Safe pedestrian crossings
    Traffic calming measures
    Safe paving – constructed to avoid vehicles being driven at speed up onto and, at times, along pavements
    Pavements being built to create safer pedestrian access( example see Ashdon Rd past Homebase to DeVigier Avenue)
    Pavements maintained ( example plant overgrowth across Victoria Avenue from Thaxted junction; shrubs overhanging pathways necessitating a move closer to/ in roadways to pass along)
    Creating pedestrian cut throughs to facilitate greater pedestrian access across the town
    Get adult cyclists off pavements – new planning to incorporate cycle tracks would be a start

  2. I am concerned about the proposed development both here, and on the water-meadow near the duck pond. I concerned about parking, safe pedestrian routes (no pavements on Freshwell Street), pollution, development within protected areas, restrictions to views.

  3. I am in total agreement with Marion Gillman. I live in the new development opposite Ridgeons and there is absolutely no incentive for people to walk to the town centre rather than drive. For example, because there is no footpath adjacent to Dame Bradbury School, people are obliged to cross the road at least once to walk on the other side, and there is no safe crossing for children. Cars are constantly mounting the pavement along Ashdon Road to get through, endangering the lives of pedestrians and the air is polluted with traffic fumes. Until something is done to address the problem of the abysmal infrastructure and improve public transport, no building should take place to the North or South sides of the town. Everyone should be mindful of global warming and the effects on the environment and encouraging sustainable development. Whereas I do not wish our beautiful countryside to be ruined by a ring road, this may be the only solution to the problem.

  4. With regard to policy SW2, I am in complete agreement about protection of views. Saffron Walden nestles in a valley and this should be preserved as far as possible. It appears that most of the new developments are being built on high land and stand out like a sore thumb, spoiling many of the beautiful views. I know the new B&M is a commercial building but it has ruined the view from Cole End. It could at least have been painted black so it does not dominate the view.

  5. One of the effects of the new developments is to shift the geographic centre of the town east and south. A quick visual estimate would put it around R A Butler school. The actual town centre is well into the north-west quadrant so the library, banks, post office medical facilities, and most retail outlets, are clustered well away from the new housing. Although the town is modestly sized, the geology, coupled with poor pavement provision, means that going shopping and carrying purchases home (often uphill) is a major deterrent to walking. I strongly support Marion’s comments above. Thaxted Road and Ashdon Road are particularly challenging for pedestrians and both of these are key routes from the new developments into town.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Neighbourhood Plan Objectives

Objective 1

Saffron Walden will be an economically active and self-sustaining town, offering equal opportunities to all.

Objective 2

Saffron Walden’s residents will be able to live as healthily as possible.

Objective 3

Saffron Walden will be an environmentally sustainable town.

Objective 4

Saffron Walden’s heritage assets, high quality landscape and conservation areas will be protected or enhanced.

Objective 5

Saffron Walden will retain its market-town feel and community spirit.

POLICIES

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